Crafts folk get to grips with all things willow

Local people now have the skills and techniques to make small to medium- sized willow sculptures. Organised as part of the West Copeland Lengthsmen scheme, a small group honed their skills during a workshop at Egremont […]
Some of the willow sculptures

Some of the willow sculptures

Local people now have the skills and techniques to make small to medium- sized willow sculptures.

Organised as part of the West Copeland Lengthsmen scheme, a small group honed their skills during a workshop at Egremont Market Hall.

Cumbria based coppice worker and greenwood crafts person, Helen Elvin, led the session and guided the group through all the processes to make sure they mastered the basic skills needed to craft their own piece of sculpture, which they took home at the end of the day.

The group were also advised on choosing, sorting and preparing willow for use. The activity brought people together from different Parishes across West Copeland. The emphasis of the session was not only to up-skill those taking part, but to raise awareness of environmental issues and celebrate the beauty and diversity of nature.

As well as organising up-skilling events like this, the Lengthsmen scheme employs a full-time environmental worker and an apprentice who carry out tasks in Parishes, like grass cutting, litter picking, unblocking gulleys and maintaining fences, notice boards and benches.

Up-skilling the community on sustaining and nurturing the environment is an important part of the Lengthsmen scheme. The Lengthsmen scheme is funded by Copeland Community Fund, Leconfield Estates, and parish councils.

The event was organised by one of the Council’s Community Regeneration Officers, Chris Pickles.