Exciting new extension opens at the Beacon

by Rachael Grealish

Learn about the stars, the sun and the sky like never before in the all new interactive exhibit.     -Photo by Robert Haile

Learn about the stars, the sun and the sky like never before in the all new interactive exhibit. -Photo by Robert Haile

YOU can now explore our Universe, immerse yourself in the formation of stars and run for cover to avoid violent eruptions from the Sun – all from the comfort of the Beacon Museum, thanks to a collaboration with the University of Central Lancashire.

‘Exploring Light and Dark’ is a stunning new exhibition running from Saturday, 11 June.

The exhibition is placed in the new 15 square foot extension on the fourth floor of the Beacon.

The exhibit introduces cutting-edge scientific research in the heart of the museum.

The exhibition aims to strengthen the link between university researchers and the West Coast of the Lake District.

The initiative is the first collaboration between the University of Central Lancashire and The Beacon Museum, Whitehaven, centring on scientific research in a museum environment and placing Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) subjects alongside history, culture and heritage.

Elizabeth Kwasnik, Beacon Museum Director said: “We’re delighted to welcome the University to the Beacon for this visually stunning exhibition. “This is the first exhibition to be staged in our newly opened 4th floor Gallery and it is aimed at highlighting the importance of STEM in our region.”

Exploring Light and Dark is partially funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council and is presented as part of a varied programme of community engagement, including dance, storytelling and craft sessions together with a series of science social evenings.

This all creates an exciting opportunity for members of the public to participate in scientific discussion directly with researchers.Alex Farthing, business development officer of the Beacon Museum, said: “We hope the new exhibition will be really enjoyable for people of all ages.”

The exhibition includes various interactive features for children – including the chance for children to build their own stone circle.

 

See the sun like never before thanks to a time-lapse video of sun giving views of the sun unseeable to  the naked eye.

See the sun like never before thanks to a time-lapse video of sun giving views of the sun unseeable to the naked eye.

The floor is split into two halves: one light side and a room in darkness where there is an 18 minutes video showing the different colours, shapes and sights of the sun that aren’t viewable by the naked eye.

Exploring light and dark runs until July 10.

The talk ‘A new encounter with our sun’ by Professor Robert Walsh is on Tuesday July 5.