Zebra’s climbed England’s highest peak for charity

Rachael Grealish reports on the success of the ehlers-danlos syndrome charity walk up Scafell Pike.

On top of the world: The team of inexperienced walkers made it up Scafell Pike in four hours raising money for the EDS charity. - Photo by Samantha Benson

On top of the world: The team of inexperienced walkers made it up Scafell Pike in four hours raising money for the EDS charity. – Photo by Samantha Benson

ZEBRA’S proved they could climb mountains as they took on England’s highest peak, in May.

A team of inexperienced walkers made it up Scafell Pike on Monday May 30, in order to raise money and awareness for the ehlers-danlos syndrome (EDS) charity.

The team of twelve, that made it to the summit, was organised and lead by Jo Haig, who suffers from EDS.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is the name for a group of inherited conditions that affect connective tissue.

The team set off at 9am and made it up the mountain 4 hours later – but it wasn’t easy.

Jo said: “After four hours of pain, fatigue and water stops, not to mention gallons of sun cream and pain killers here and there, we made it to the summit of Scafell pike- the views as we hiked were spectacular and the support to each other was amazing to see.”

The journey is a challenge for most people, but Jo risked dislocating limbs and seriously injuring herself due to her condition.

She said: “If I had dislocated I would’ve had to reach the summit by air ambulance – I was lucky, though, my joints gave way and the stability in them that I’d built up in the nine months of training was gone. But thankfully my joints were strapped and braced in place so tightly I didn’t dislocate.”

The team was accompanied by trained medics in case of emergencies – and though there was none, Jo explained they racked up quite the accident log.

The accident log included everything from heat stroke and muscle spasm to a dislocation and even a head injury – which Jo suffered.

She said: “Sods law, two fields from the pub at the finish line, my ankle gave way- both ankles had lost stability and had been giving way all the way down, I was lucky enough to catch it just before a fall each time- until the end.”

Jo explained that it was the support of her team mates that really helped her to the top – especially her walking group of Danielle Murphy, Samantha Benson and Kris Longton.

Samantha Benson said: “I had never heard of EDS before Jo was diagnosed … I decided to support Jo to help her raise awareness for EDS and prove that people with disabilities can do impressive things, albeit with support.”

The team raised over £1000 for the EDS charity – but Jo said they don’t plan to stop there.

She said: “ We’re planning a family friendly one and a swim in the lake next. In hindsight we maybe should have started with that.”